I’ve heard of a “Day of the Cowboy,” but is there a “Day of the Native American?”

I’ve heard of a “Day of the Cowboy,” but is there a “Day of the Native American?”

Harvey Scott

Leeds, West Yorkshire, England

Actually, there is. And it dates back to  1914, when Red Fox James, a member of the Blackfoot tribe, rode horseback from state to state in the hope of gaining support for a day of tribute.

The following year, Dr. Arthur C. Parker, a member of the Seneca tribe, persuaded the Boy Scouts of America to designate a day of recognition for Indians. In 1916, New York was the first state to observe American Indian Day. Over the years, other states followed suit.

In 1976, a U.S. Senate resolution authorized our president to declare a Native American Awareness Week. That was expanded to a month in 1990. It is celebrated in November.

What do you think?

Marshall Trimble

Marshall Trimble is Arizona’s official historian, board president of the Arizona Historical Society and vice president of the Wild West History Association. His latest book is Arizona’s Outlaws and Lawmen; History Press, 2015. If you have a question, write: Ask the Marshall, P.O. Box 8008, Cave Creek, AZ 85327 or e-mail him at marshall.trimble@scottsdalecc.edu