History Features

Wild Women of the West

Not all of them made their living as soiled doves.

The great female shortage, that was one of the dominating, formative and frustrating facts of the early West.

In 1849, for example, only about 5,000 women were among the 50,000 Americans who went west. The shortage of women created a climate in which soiled doves like Big Nose Kate of Tombstone, Arizona, and Squirrel Tooth Alice of Dodge City, Kansas, bloomed in brilliant scarlet. But the climate enabled other ladies to flower in far more honorable hues. The Western frontier woman, being scarce and highly valued, could do things of which her Eastern sister could only dream.

 

Chris Enss is the author of numerous women of the West books. Her books released this year are: High Country Women: Pioneers of Yosemite National Park and the second edition of Outlaw Tales of California: True Stories of the Golden State’s Most Infamous Crooks, Culprits, and Cutthroats.




Please click on the image to watch the slideshow, read about the remarkable Wild Women of the West!




 


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True West captures the spirit of the American West with authenticity, personality and humor by linking our history to our present. Whether you call it the Wild West, the Old West or the Far West, America's frontier history comes to life in True West, the world's oldest, continuously published Western Americana magazine.

Western movie fans, re-enactors, history buffs and road warriors, we got your history covered: outlaw, cowboy, Indian, lawman, gunfighter, fur trapper, miner, prospector, gambler, soldier, entertainer and pioneer. Check out these True Westerners now!
 

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